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Thursday, September 9, 2010

BACKUP WOOD FOR WOOD BURNER


With summer winding down and fall just around the corner, it's time to start thinking about home heating. As preppers we are always looking for innovative ways to save money, prepare for the future, without sacrificing creature comforts. Recently my mother in law was out at a garage sale, and called to tell me about a paper roller she picked up for us. The paper roller looks like the one in the picture above. Knowing that we are preppers and in the process of installing a wood burner, she thought this would be a nice addition to our preps. We currently heat our home with fuel oil, and knew with the rising cost of fuel we had to make a change. I am really excited about this paper roller, and am hoping this turns out to be a nice addition to our preps.

I had never heard or seen this type of thing before, so I decided to do a bit of research. I was surprised to read that this is not a new innovation, but never living in a house with a wood burner or fireplace, I have not been exposed to newspaper rollers. The newspapers are put into a slot and as you roll the paper, pull up on the paper to make the roll good and tight. Keep adding newspapers till you get the desired thickness and tie with a piece of twine or a large twist tie. A few websites said the paper could be soaked in water or fabric softener, then rolled, then let sit for couple months to thoroughly dry. Many people have reported that these paper logs burn long and hot. I have not personally done this before, but will be doing so in the near future. I researched the cost of these newspaper log rollers and they retail at about 40.00. Not a bad investment, if you have a supply of newspapers or some family and friends to get them from. This could also help keep the cost of wood down to a minimum.

If anyone has ever used these log rollers before, I would appreciate any input on these. Did they work? Were you able to supplement between the paper rolls and wood, and any tricks that worked for you. This blog is about sharing knowledge and skills and yes we do learn from you too.

Blessings,

Shelly





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3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Shelly I grew up with a paper log roller. My folks had one over 30 years ago and we used it a little each winter. They are not a ton of work and they do burn. This was never a replacement for real wood just a suppliment. The trick is getting them rolled tight enough otherwise they burned poorly. They are nice to add some heat to the room as they burn a little fast and very hot. They also make a bit more ash than real wood and if you burn the adverts and such with them you got pretty colors LMAO. Be careful with venting as these can make more CO3 than clean wood.

Mikeylikes

Shelly said...

Thanks Mikey for the input. I never thought of the CO3 factor and the extra ashe. This may be more of an early fall/spring thing for us to take the chill out of the house before the heat of the day, and a fire starter. My kids would love the pretty colors from the ads. lol Thanks for stopping by and giving some advice.

Anonymous said...

I remember many evenings sitting in the family room rolling these also as a youngster. We would wet the paper first then roll it, it rolls tighter and burns slower when dried. We also used bailing wire to secure them as regular twine would burn too fast.

First I ever heard of CO3 from paper logs. Carbon trioxide (CO3) is an unstable product of reactions between carbon dioxide (CO2) and atomic oxygen - So do you mean CO? Carbon Monoxide due to the soy ink they use in it may give off more? I've done a search and can't find ANY reference to more CO being given off.

"J"

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